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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 587 (some duplicates have been removed)
the need outside the elevator using current technology and we learn about the latest destination elevated technology all here in san francisco. we will also visit the machinery where all the behind- the-scenes gears control these incredible machines. we are very fortunate today to have an expert with those who is going to walk us are around elevators in san francisco. can you tell us about the history of elevators in san francisco? the measure -- >> sure. the history of elevator technology evolves with the city. first elevators were installed for moving materials in the 1860's. in the 1870's, the first passenger elevator was installed, and that allowed building heights to go up to about seven floors. starting in the 18 eighties, 1890's, the first electric elevators were installed. that allowed for buildings to go up even higher, even more than 10 floors, and those were the first elevators that became representative of what we consider modern elevators today. >> so the height of buildings is related to elevator technology. >> both of these technologies encourage architects to build taller
at sharp are also betting on one unique technology to bring business back. we explain. >> reporter: engineers at sharp looked into the future and the monitors, public computers and in smartphones too. the new liquid crystal display technology is called igzo. it reduces power consumption by a fifth. only sharp owns this technology, for now. >> translator: smartphone batteries that last longer are very appealing. >> reporter: in december, a market research firm ranked smartphones with a igzo panel as the number one seller in japan. >> translator: we're getting many inquiries of products. that would certainly boost our sales. >> reporter: sharp executives are pinning hopes on this technology? >> translator: igzo is contributing a lot to improving our business. >> analysts say sharp executives may need to learn more from their past mistakes. executives invested nearly $5 billion to increase production lines for liquid crystal displays. it didn't take long for south korean and taiwanese competitors to catch up. sharp eventually lost in the price war and posted a steep decline in profits
, from health care, from these markets that we're just scratching the surface in terms of technology applications. >> host: will panasonic still be manufacturing televisions? >> guest: i don't know. >> host: will the word "television" still be in use? >> guest: probably old people like me will still be using the word "television." and i think displays will still have a prominent role in the home for communicating content and information. >> host: joe taylor, chairman and president of panasonic in north america, this is "the communicators" on c-span. "the communicators" is on location at ces international 2013, the technology trade show. more programming next week. >> just ahead, president obama speaks at a ceremony honoring recipients of this year's national medals for science, technology and innovation. after that we're live with a national health policy conference with industry leaders and representatives of government who will discuss what to expect in health care policy this year. and later more live coverage as former first lady laura bush speaks at the susan g. komen for the cu
care reform. last but not least the use of technology. we have the ability to share information with technology that we have today with their computers and the internet, have databases where we can share information with doctors and hospitals and they can keep the costs down and make sure that the consumer has good information and thorough information so that they can make the choice. it gives power to the consumer which i think we all appreciate and frankly at the end of the day i trust the consumer to make the decisions that are in the best interest for them. we have too much of a government mentality. we know best. we need to choose for you. you may make the wrong decision and i think that is wrongheaded. so let me conclude this part by saying what i'm talking about with utah here is a way of addressing this reform. it may not be the way. other states have different demographics. we have a young population in utah. we are the youngest in america. i am the oldest guy in utah. [laughter] if you compared our demographics with safe florida which has a lot more seniors compound th
. >> the science, space and technology committee will come to order. i'll recognize myself for an opening statement and the ranking member for her opening statement. the topic of today's hearing, the first of this committee and this congress, is american competitiveness. the role of research and development. this is an appropriate hearing because much of the jurisdiction of this committee relates to keeping america globally competitive. america's ability to compete depends on whether we have the present vision to conduct the science that will define the future. as the wall behind me says, where there is no vision, the people perish. this committee's goal and today's hearing is to help define that vision and ensure that america continues to be the leader of global innovation. our first hearing today will will begin this process by examining the positive impact of today's r&d and looking forward to potential breakthrough innovations in the future. americans have always been innovators and explorers. our ancestors crossed oceans, opened fronttears and ventured to explore a new content and even travel
companies of our time, a behemoth built on the best technology that could be invented required tedious today the business that this brilliant industrialist acquired agreed to pay $2.1 billion in cold hard cash for acne packet, a company that enables voice to be carried over the internet among other skill sets and has been down on its financial looked like acme dynamite. is considered top notch. ellison is taking advantage of the pullback time talking about. oracle is paying $29.25 a share. the stock is down from $83 less than a year ago. it's only down because it had a couple short falls that won't matter at all when it is part of a sweeter product that gives oracle a hardware and software solution. frankly it is brilliant, so brilliant the markets say it could be higher because at me pack it was trading above the price. ellison is a buyer. how about this michael down fila? he's a huge debt buyer. his just announced leveraged buyout to purchase the company for more than 35% above where the stock stood up that long ago. the price tag is down from $50 a year ago and $25 five years ago. michael
: in terms of water supply, wastewater, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water
dell strikes a $24 billion deal to go private. what the buyout means for investors and the technology industry. >> susie: the u.s. government wants as much as $5 billion from standard and poors, officially accusing the credit ratings agency of fraud during the housing boom. >> tom: and earnings from a trio of consumer stocks finds us spending money on eating out and watching tv. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> tom: a bold new chapter for computer maker dell was opened today. michael dell said today he's taking the company he founded almost 30 years ago private. it's a $24.5 billion deal offering dell investors $13.65 per share. now, at one point, dell was the largest p.c. maker in the world, boasting market capitalization of more than $100 billion. now, it sits behind apple, hewlett packard and lenovo, valued a fifth of what it once was. ruben ramirez begins are coverage. >> reporter: michael dell admits he missed the consumer shift away from the p.c. to tablets and smartphones, but today's announcement his company is going private doesn't necessary address how dell is
his own technology research firm, g.v.a. research. >> susie: so, david, the big question of the day, today was what can michael dell do with his dell computer company as a private company he couldn't do as a public company? what's different, really? >> out of the public eye, dell can go through some fairly wrenching shifts in terms of the mix of business the company has, and be able to do so without necessarily having to essentially hold the hand of public sector equity investors. from that standpoint, we can look at a fairly strong deemphasis of the customer p.c. business. the company will most likely stay with the enterprise. but what the company does in terms of trying to pursue or stay relevant to this shift over to tablet p.c.s and smartphones remains a very open question. >> susie: these are uncertain times for any p.c.-maker. it is isn't a dell-only problem. you wonder can michael dell really fix things up at dell? >> certainly he has done well enough in the past. but investors have been scratching their heads in the last five years, wondering what is the next great idea mich
a bright spot for the u.s. economy. thanks to new fracking technology, surging domestic production cut crude oil imports last year by 227 million barrels. but that success was offset somewhat by imports of manufactured goods. >> the flip side of the coin is that our imports of non-oil goods are still going up. they're going up pretty rapidly. and that is of great concern to me as an economist. those are the things that compete with our own manufactured products. >> reporter: china remains a major competitor for u.s. companies. our trade deficit with china hit a record $315 billion last year. separately, china reported it's exports grew 25% over a year ago, easily beating expectations. the robust growth was attributed to aggressive new lending by chinese banks. >> just a few months ago, the chinese economy was in contraction. we've seen really two or three months where we are seeing much stronger growth in china and that's increasing the demand for goods there. >> reporter: but analysts say the news from china may have been somewhat distorted by statistical quirks and the start of the c
, the economy is booming. oil companies are using a relatively new technology called fracking to get that oil and gas reserves kilometers underground. it uses chemicals to break through shale rock and stone. the technology is controversial, but energy experts say the benefits far outweigh the costs. u.s. oil production has exploded in the past couple of years from 23 million cubic meters per day in the year 2000 to 712 million cubic meters today. experts believe the new technology could make the u.s. energy independent within the next 20 years. this would have serious implications for global politics, especially in the middle east. because the u.s. is dependent on middle east oil, it helps maintain security there. the strait of hormuz is the biggest oil route in the world. the u.s. protect tankers sailing straight. should america stop protecting the waters, the eu may have to take on more responsibility for security there and for the entire middle east. europe already helps keep waters safe around the horn of africa. russia would also feel the effects of an energy independent america. u.s. oi
previous nuclear tests, the north's missile technology is increasingly sophisticated. resc rescue crews are headed for the solomon islands. the waves washed away dozens of homes. six people died. four are missing. the tsunami reached more than 90 centimeters. government officials in the solomons islands say three coastal villages suffered severe damage. photos taken by world vision show buildings washed away leaving only the foundations behind. spokesperson say the tsunami swept away 100 houses. one photo shows a house full of debris. aftershocks have registered more than five on the richterale. analysts have recorded more than 50 of them. >>> french president has said the fight in mali is not over. but he said some french troops may pull out of the west african country next month if all goes according to plan. islamist insurgents have taken over northern mali. they moved into the colony last month to help stop a rebel offensive. 4,000 personnel joined the mission. many filed alongside malian forces to regain control of northern cities. a government spokesperson said a withdraw would de
. a collection of innovations designed around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs - each of your bodies. our sleep professionals will help you find your sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort ... individualized. at the ultimate sleep number event, queen mattresses start at just $599 . and save 50% on our innovative limited edition bed. >> marketing pro, he is here talking about the much-anticipated super bowl commercials. before we run down the favorites, a lot of super bowl ads were released ahead of time on the internet, that is a newer trend, a lot of times it was hush, hush, so why are they watching them before the game. >> people enjoy them, and anticipate watching them again during the super bowl. so it builds the anticipation and they get more bang for their buck, because people are watching them on youtube. >> you will watch them anyway, because you want to watch them with everyone else etch if you saw it. >> let's run down them. >> this one right here is a coca-cola spot, take a loo
of technology in the southern part of the district. home of microsoft and a lot of biomedical device companies and rich agricultural industry of dairies and specialty crops. emigration is important from many different aspects. you talked -- we talked about h1b minute talk about a starter visa program. would you talk about how that would work in conjunction with the program? >> the starter visa would do wonderful -- wonders for seattle and new york and more for silicon valley. there are tens of thousands of companies that would be started almost overnight if we gave the entrepreneurs the ability to do that. it can start a company but you cannot work for a period that is brain dead. we would have a boom in entrepreneurship but we have not seen before. it should be done independently of everything else we're doing. just get that done so we can fix the immediate problem. there is the issue of hab's. -- h1b's. there are debates about whether they take jobs away. and in other parts you do need h1b's. the more urgent thing is to give green cards to the millions who are already here. let them start th
but solid technology companies with good cash flow trying as much as $15 billion. i can't think of a better affirmation what that could be worth and what an in-your-face sign that the personal-computer portion of technology has a few innings left in the game. how about companies that already have a problem? what do we do with those? are they being bought? are these valuations stretched as the younger analysts have repeatedly told us? take virgin media, a company when i was looking at the charts, that's a gigantic european cable company. stock trading $21 a little less than a year ago, closed at $38 and change yesterday. isn't that too much of a run? >> isn't that a stock worth selling? knot if you are john malone, the dean of the cable industry. in this company, entertainment, a man so renowned for his deal savvy that my colleague on squawk on the street this morning called him the smartest man he ever met, which after i had taken a minute's worth of on bridge about i found myself in courage. malone is not even walking away from the game. he's paying mid-40s. under 50 but mid-40s for possib
figures out how we advanced to that next stage, how we build out these technologies, clean technologies and diverse technologies that allow us to do more and do it in no way that is an environmentally responsible way. imposing the mandates of other heavy hand of ideas that are out there for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. they are not going to pass congress. what we need to be dealing, as we move forward, there will be rolled-making efforts. -- rule-making efforts. need to find those ways that we develop the technologies to really allow us to have that greater environmental responsibility. we need to develop resources that we have today, do it domestically so we cut our dependence on opec. take a portion of that revenue and we specifically dedicate it to the energy solutions of tomorrow. we talk about the energy deployment fund and how it will build out and advance. that is the framework. it is good reading and it is designed to advance the discussion on a critically important topic. . do see a lot of new changes happening to the new administration. how could we summarize those chang
. >>> eyes in the sky. unmanned drones, wartime technology roaming the skies here at home. who are they watching, and why? >>> the struggle. new jersey governor chris christie is in the middle of a fight erupting in public over his own weight. tonight what a former white house doctor said about him and how he fired back. >>> and one year from tonight, if you can believe it, opening ceremonies at the winter olympics. tonight we'll show you the resort town packed with palm trees where they hope to have snow on the slopes a year from now. "nightly news" begins now. "nightly news" begins now. >>> from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >> good evening. for the folks who have moved to an all-electronic web-based life, today's news maybe wasn't all that impactful. but for the folks with mailboxes in cities and towns across this countron dirt roads or in apartment buildings, there's always been mail on saturday. six days a week, since the time of abraham lincoln. but today the u.s. postal service says delivering the mail on saturda
think about what core labs, the company with the technology behind finding so much new oil in old places said last night, last night right here when it detailed its quarter. a quarter that by the way drove the stock up $10.44 to finish today, core told us there could be not one, but two gigantic oil fields in this country we don't even know about, the size of the bakken and eagle ford, the two shales that have made the pipe dream of north american energy self-sufficiency into a reality that we could see in just a couple years time. could you imagine? i think america's oil and gas industry is in the early innings of the second game of the double-header. first game being spindle top. and that's what makes me so hopeful about the rest of the year. beyond just betting history repeats itself. the baltimore-like industrials are beginning to flex their muscles. we've had only one solid quarter from china under our belt. we just jumped over the fiscal cliff in this country. europe just now stabilizing. these recoveries foretell a dramatic increase in orders for our industrials as we saw in the a
, receptionists, not things where your skills get stale because of advances in technology there are plenty of all unemployed workers that work and technology fields or feel for the technology continues to develop. sometimes they spend that time keeping up with their skills. most people who are computer professionals are people love to be on the computer and love to learn the new thing. even if they are not working and i have spoken to many workers, they are learning new programs out there and learning new technology on their own because that's just what they do. the way i would read a book for pleasure, they will get on a computer and learn something new because that's what they enjoy doing. there is this assumption among some employers that skills are getting stale but there is no looking at the resume for speaking to a qualified individual if that is true. host: the federal level made an effort on this action as well. this was the federal fair employment opportunity act of 2011. it would make it illegal for employers to discriminate against the unemployed, job applicants could sue and recover d
casualties, but relative to any other technology we have short of sending in, you know, an assassin with a sniper rifle which in many cases just isn't practical, drones are the best way to sort of take the enemy off the battlefield. they don't cost a lot of money. there's no risk to u.s. forces and it's more or less invisible. you don't see pictures of the, by and large, huge craters because they leave pretty small imprints. it's just a couple hellfire missiles pretty often. pretty irresistible. what we have not had so much debate about is what are the consequences in those countries where people see the effects of the drones, their relatives are being killed. are we potentially creating more terrorists over the long run than we're killing. that's the burning policy question in washington. i think there hasn't been enough debate about it. >> the other question it raised in your article is the obama administration asked the faa to speed up processing of integrated drones into civilian air space. they could be used by police departments, farmers, builders, hollywood, but with this pro
announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur using robotics and mobile technology, verizon innovators have made it possible for teachers to teach, and for a kid... nathan. tadpole. ... to feel like a kid again. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. [ male announcer ] when you wear dentures you may not know it, but your mouth is under attack. food particles infiltrate and bacteria proliferate. ♪ protect your mouth, with fixodent. the adhesive helps create a food seal defense for a clean mouth and kills bacteria for fresh breath. ♪ fixodent, and forget it. >> it has been almost a year since kim jong-un the third son of kim jong-il took power in north korea after his father's death. >> the other so
technology, family friendly. we have all the details about the auto show when fox 5 morning news continues after the break. wh ole ain, multigrain cheerios! my bowl, my spoons! mom, are those my jeans? [ female announcer ] people who choose more whole grain tend to weigh less than those who don't. multigrain cheerios has whole grain and 110 delicious calories. ...more grains. less you! multigrain cheerios in multi-grain cheerios peanut butter. progress-oh! -oh! -oh! oh! oh! ♪ what do you know? oh! ♪ bacon? -oh! -oh! oh! [ female announcer ] with 40 delicious progresso soups at 100 calories or less, there are plenty of reasons people are saying "progress-oh!" share your story for a chance to win a progress-oh! makeover in hollywood. go to facebook.com/progresso to enter. >>> time to answer today's super bowl trivia question. we asked which of these teams, you'll see them, which of these teams we showed you earlier are undefeated in the super bowl? >> remember,, they've been in the super bowl, because some haven't been in the super bowl. out of these teams do you have an answer? you know
eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur using robotics and mobile technology, verizon innovators have made it possible for teachers to teach, and for a kid... nathan. tadpole. ... to feel like a kid again. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. [ male announcer ] when you wear dentures you may not know it, but your mouth is under attack. food particles infiltrate and bacteria proliferate. ♪ protect your mouth, with fixodent. the adhesive helps create a food seal defense for a clean mouth and kills bacteria for fresh breath. ♪ fixodent, and forget it. >> it has been almost a year since kim jong-un the third son of kim jong-il took power in north korea after his father's death. >> the other sons were perceived to
and border patrol and technology. "washington journal" is next. ♪ host: congress returns today, part of the agenda includes consideration of a bill requiring the white house to produce a balanced budget. the story today from "the washington times" airlines readers that the budget act requires the president to put out a budget by the first monday of february. senator harry reid said the gun legislation in the senate will include magazine size and background checks, but it would not seek a ban on military-style assault weapons. an amendment could be included to cover that. the president heads to minneapolis to discuss gun control. and the cost of the 2012 elections are in. the final price tag is estimated at $7 billion. according to the consumer confidence index, half the respondents said that the financial crisis went under the labour retirement plan. we are interested in hearing from you if the financial crisis delay your retirement. want to give us a call, the numbers are on your screen. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. if y
like taking risk in this environment. apple is the technology company and i can understand apple's view that they have freedom of cash on the balance sheet. some of this is complicated. some of the cash is overseas, they bring it home, thee incur some tax liability. cash on your balance sheet is freedom. it's freedom from bankers. >> we're going to slip in a quick break. bob, you're going to be with us for the rest of the hour. and i'm going to send it back to pebble beach and the one and only becky quick. >> when we come back, we're talking about putting money to work behind the next big thing. since we're here on the west coast, we figured we had to technology technology. we're going to talk to an investor in siri intelligent and ask him if he thinks aapple has a cash problem. plus, a live report on the weather in the northeast as they phase for blizzard conditions. i'm glad we got cdw and cisco to design our data center. yeah, the cisco ucsc series server, with the intel xeon processors, help us scale smoothly, like a perfect golf swing. how was it before? clunky and full of unnecess
that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: former u.s. senator chuck hagel faced a hostile reception today from half of the committee that must sign off before he can become secretary of defense. his senate confirmation hearing centered heavily on criticism from his one-time republican colleagues. the atmosphere was friendly enough at the outset as chuck hagel began his big day before the armed services committee. he quickly sought to allay concerns on both sides about his positions on everything from iran to israel to nuclear weapons. >> no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement defines me, my beliefs, or my record. my overall world view has never changed: that america has and must mainta
play a limited role in the future. the present generation of nuclear technology is way too expeive. if you run a utility and you decide to build a new nuclear power plant, you go to your engineers or you go to any engineering consulting firm in the world and ask,okay, how much will this cost. they will say to you we really have no idea. >> right. >> then ask you them how long will it take to build it. and they'll say we don't know. >> and those are serious problems if you are trying to build a power plant. and that's really why the industry has declined. to state the issues, even after fushima, can-- it can be managed. >> rose: so it's the cost, not the safety. >> it's the cost and it's the nature of the, of the cost accounting. they're only in a thousand to 1200 megawatts, that means that they used to cause 4 or 500 million, now it's 5, 6, 8 billion dollars. if takes a long time. you don't want to build increments that are that big that take that long. particularly in an age like the '70s after the oil shocks where you don't know what conservation and efficiency and renewables wil
these technology companies that are coming here and helping us uplift our economy, even within that success, you hear me talking about the people who aren't getting those jobs, the people who are making decisions everyday in our streets, in our community, and i will not be mincing words -- it is in the bay view. in in the visitation valley. it is in the mission where their dispute resolution is at the end of a gun and this is the way they're talking. this is the way they're dealing with each other and then with anybody who attempts to interfere with that. you have heard me say even with the success of all of our departments and everything that they're doing i can't give a job to a dead youth no matter what we do, and so i can have the best training programs. i can have a high number of jobs available. eric mcdonald and i can create 10,000 jobs in the summer, but if our youth are resolving their differences with the point of a gun or the end of a knife those jobs are never going to be available to them. how do we interrupt that violence? i cannot put it all on our police department. they k
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 587 (some duplicates have been removed)

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